Workshops & Tutorials

Monday, June 17th, 2019

Friday, June 21st, 2019


June 17th, 2019

Tutorial – Introduction to AI & Law

Organizers:

Abstract:

The goal of the tutorial is to provide the audience with sufficient background to enable them to appreciate and to engage with the ideas and issues presented in the remainder of the 2019 Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law. The tutorial is intended for newcomers to the field of Artificial Intelligence and Law or those who wish to have a ‘refresher’ course. No technical knowledge on the part of the audience will be assumed. Topics covered include: Formalizing legislation using logic; Deducing vs. arguing from legal rules; Argument schema and diagrams; Lessons learned about modeling legal rules; Representing legal concepts with ontologies; Case-based models of legal reasoning; natural language processing of legal texts; legal information retrieval; Machine Learning & Legal Data Analytics (including case outcome prediction); selected technology-relevant jurisprudence; basics of fair machine learning; other current issues in AI and Law.


Tutorial – Defeasible Logic for Normative Reasoning

Organizer: Guido Governatori, Data61, CSIRO

Abstract:

This tutorial will guide the attendees through the theoretical and practical development of a computationally oriented logic (defeasible logic) that proved successful in applications in the legal domain.


Doctoral Consortium

Organizer: Michał Araszkiewicz, Jagiellonian University in Kraków

Abstract:

The ICAIL 2019 Doctoral Consortium aims at promoting the exchange of ideas from PhD researchers in the area of Artificial Intelligence and Law, and at providing them an opportunity to interact and receive feedback from leading scholars and experts in the field.  Specifically, the Consortium seeks to provide opportunities for PhD students to:


2nd Workshop on AI in Legal Practice

Organizer: Katie Atkinson, University of Liverpool

Abstract:

This is the second edition of the ICAIL Workshop on AI in Legal Practice, following the popular first edition held in 2017 in London.  The aim of the workshop is to bring together all stakeholders interested in applying AI within legal practice.  The workshop will consist of a variety of sessions, including invited talks from industry, demonstrations of LegalTech software, panels on current challenge topics and audience discussion about progressing the field.  The workshop aims to be inclusive by bringing together lawyers, academics and commercial parties to foster knowledge exchange and collaborative working.  Participants both with and without knowledge and experience of applying AI in legal practice are welcome to join the workshop.  


1st Workshop on AI vs. Intelligent Assistance for Legal Professionals in the Digital Workplace (LegalAIIA)

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Abstract:

Over the past decade, increased use of machine learning and other artificial intelligence technologies has significantly increased legal professionals’ abilities to efficiently access, process, and analyze digital information. AI breakthroughs continue to improve everything from advanced search to information extraction and visualization to data summarization, classification, and review. At the same time, concerns over transparency and the potential limitations of fully automated approaches to problems in the legal space have led to an upsurge of interest in methods that incorporate human intelligence –- the so-called “human-in- the-loop” approach to AI. The debate over using AI as a replacement for humans, as opposed to an augmentation of human abilities, otherwise known as IA or Intelligent Assistance, is over half a century old, but currently the pendulum is swinging back toward the augmentation or IA perspective. However, not all human-AI collaborative effort is guaranteed to be fruitful. Research into the nature, degree, and efficiency of the human contribution to various applications is needed to ensure that the efforts and resources are deployed effectively.


LegRegSW 2019: A Workshop on a Legislation and Regulation Semantic Web – a shared corpus task

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Abstract:

This workshop will bring together academics, lawyers, government administrators, legal service providers, and corporate researchers to analyze and discuss a shared, linked corpus of legislation and regulation that is represented in a machine readable form, e.g. Semantic Web/Knowledge Graph technologies. With such technologies, data is published in a standardized format such as Resource Description Framework (RDF), Web Ontology Language (OWL), Extensible Markup Language (XML), or others. Such formats facilitate querying, linking, and inferencing over the internet and with automation. The goal of working with a shared corpus using the Semantic Web is that individual researchers can work with tools, formats, or approaches or theories as they wish, but still have a common basis for discussion, linking, and accessing resources. Over the course of the workshop (before, during and after), efforts will be made to integrate the contributions and demonstrate the utility of a prototype legislative/regulatory Semantic Web. The shared corpus will be a relatively small, coherent, multi-jurisdictional, related set of documents of international relevance as selected by the workshop organisers.


1st Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and the Administrative State

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Abstract:

Much of the work of modern governance – including delivery of public services, adjudication of entitlement to public benefits, and enforcement of legal mandates – is performed by administrative agencies controlled by statutes, regulations, and other authoritative legal sources expressed in complex, interconnected texts. Recent advances in AI technologies promise to improve the ability of all stakeholders, including agencies themselves, to operate within this complex regulatory environment. This workshop is intended to bring together practitioners, researchers, and developers at the intersection of artificial intelligence, government, administrative law, and social science to explore the implications of these advance, including  increased the effectiveness and efficiency of administrative agencies and improved access to justice and delivery of services and benefits to citizens, but also the concomitant risks, such as opacity, algorithmic bias, and threats to privacy, and due-process. The program, which will include technical and position papers, demos, and panels, is intended be accessible to computer scientists, attorneys, and social scientists.


June 21st, 2019

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Abstract:

The Third Workshop on Automated Detection, Extraction and Analysis of Semantic Information in Legal Texts (ASAIL) will be held in conjunction with ICAIL 2019: XVII International Conference on AI and Law, Friday June 21st, 2019, Montreal, Canada. It is a continuation of the successful ASAIL workshops in 2015 and 2017.
This workshop will bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars, academic and corporate researchers, legal practitioners, and legal service providers for an extended, collaborative discussion about applying natural language processing and machine learning to the semantic analysis of legal texts. Semantic analysis is the process of relating syntactic elements and structures, drawn from the levels of phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs, and whole documents, to their language-independent meanings in a given domain, including meanings specific to legal information.


Abstract:

As an associated event of ICAIL 2019, we are happy to announce the 7th Competition on Legal Information Extraction and Entailment (COLIEE-2019).
Four tasks are included in the 2019 competition: Tasks 1 and 2 are about the case law competition, and tasks 3 and 4 are about the statute law competition. Task 1 is a legal case retrieval task, and it involves reading a new case Q, and extracting supporting cases S1, S2, …, Sn from the provided case law corpus, to support the decision for Q. Task 2 is the legal case entailment task, which involves the identification of a paragraph from existing cases that entails the decision of a new case. As in previous COLIEE competitions, Task 3 is to consider a yes/no legal question Q and retrieve relevant statutes from a database of Japanese civil code statutes; Task 4 is to confirm entailment of a yes/no answer from the retrieved civil code statutes.


2nd MWAIL: Multilingual Workshop on AI & Law research

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Abstract:

The Multilingual Workshop on AI & Law Research intends to reach out to non-English speaking communities worldwide, in particular Spanish and Portuguese, to present and discuss on-going research. We invite researchers to submit their original papers (drafts 4-10 pages, final papers: 8 pages, 2400 words) and extended English abstracts (2 pages, 600 words) on the topics of legal data science applications, also in a multilingual environment, in particular advanced applications in e-justice, e-government, e-commerce and e-democracy, legal knowledge systems and formal models of legal systems, machine learning and data mining for legal applications, blockchain technology and its application in law, smart contracts etc.


Abstract:

Automated deduction is a field of research in artificial intelligence whose outputs are potentially relevant for reasoning in the legal domain; however, only few connections between the two areas have been explored so far. The present tutorial for ICAIL aims at introducing people with legal knowledge to the use of logic in the analysis of legal texts. We will be working with a system of normal bimodal logic able to represent contrary-to-duty norms; the system will be encoded in a theorem prover which can be run via a user-friendly web application; in this way, the system will be exploited to make inferences in scenarios that are supposed to be regulated by the norms of a given legal text. The tutorial is accessible to an audience without any training in formal logic; participants are only asked to bring their own computer.

Ce contenu a été mis à jour le 16 June 2019 à 11 h 47 min.